Scientific Staff

Dr. AB Pant
Principal Scientist
In Vitro Toxicology
CSIR-Indian Institute of Toxicology Research
Vishvigyan Bhavan, 31, Mahatma Gandhi Marg,
Lucknow - 226 001. Uttar Pradesh, India
Email: abpant[at]iitr[dot]res[dot]in | Alternate Email: abpant@rediffmail.com
Tel: 522-2613786 | Extension: 321
Fax: 522-2628227

Area of Specialization
In Vitro Toxicology: Mechanistic studies of neurotoxicity and developmental neurotoxicity in cultured human stem cells/ neuronal cell lines
Current R&D/S&T Activities

Current area of research work:

Applicability of plasticity and the pluripotency potential of umbilical cord blood/ mesenchymal stem cells:

To develop genetically homogenous innovative in vitro tool to understand the mechanisms involved in human specific neural development, injury and repair and to identify the stage specific biomarkers of exposure and effect for developing human brain

To develop low density genome/proteome array as biomarkers to characterize the stage specific landmarks to assess the chemical/drug induced developmental neurotoxicity and neurodegeneration

To develop unique gene chip of organ specific markers as universal predictive high throughput system to identify the toxic potential of drugs/ chemicals at organ level in one go

Brief resume of work and significant impact of the contribution to the discipline:

 

In twenty five years research career, dedicated and sustained efforts have been made to develop and validate newer, more sensitive and cost effective high throughput cell based in vitro models as alternative to experimental animals for biomedical research. Such test models have relevance to understand the molecular insights of drugs/ chemical induced toxicity and metabolism. The efforts have been rewarding as developed models got wide acceptance and are being used extensively by the scientists working in the area. Hereafter, I am detailing the works ran out in the area of neurotoxicity and developmental neurotoxicity only.

 

Human cord blood stem cell based in vitro models for developmental neurotoxicity: The developing brain is particularly vulnerable to toxic agents, even at exposure levels that have no lasting effects in the adult nervous system. Therefore, developmental neurotoxicity (DNT) assessment is a serious concern for environmental chemicals, drugs and NCEs. The studies have hampered largely due to the non availability of developing brain tissues. Thus, the investigations were made to establish the applicability of human cord blood stem cell derived neuronal cells as rapid and high throughput screening tool to assess the chemical/drug induced developmental neurotoxicity/ neuroprotection. We have reported for the first time the complete metabolic profile of developing human neurons, derived from umbilical cord blood stem cells. We have also published the data on the cellular and molecular events involved at various stages of neuronal development, and chemical induced injury and repair in differentiating neuronal cells derived from human hematopoietic stem cells. We have also identified the specific target molecules and their up and down stream signaling pathway involved in the toxicity and metabolism of xenobiotics.

Journal of Neurochemistry 2009: 109 (S1), 304

Journal of Neurochemistry2011: 118(S1), 119

Toxicological Sciences 2012;129(2):392-410)

Stem Cells and Development 2013; 22(2): 224-238

Neuro-molecular Medicine 2013; 15(3):570-592

Molecular Neurobiology 2014;May 24. [Epub ahead of print]

Differentiating PC12 cells as a model for neurotoxicity and developmental neurotoxicity: The investigations were made to understand the mechanisms involved in neural development, injury and repair using NGF induced differentiating PC12 cells. PC12 cells are rat pheochromocytoma, known to have the expression of the verity of neurotransmitter receptors and other neuronal specific marker upon their cellular differentiation. Initially, non-cytotoxic doses of monocrotophos (MCP), an organophosphate and cypermethrin (Cyp) were ascertained by exposing PC12 cells all through the NGF induced differentiation. The initial phases of differentiation were found to be more sensitive than mature well differentiated cells. Transcriptional changes were studied using taqman low density array for 96 neural specific marker genes in differentiating PC-12 cells following the exposure of MCP and Cyp (10-5 and 10-6M) for 1-8h. Genes showing significant transcriptional changes were studied for translational changes using immunocytochemical localization and western blot analysis. In general, morphological differentiation was found to be well associated with expressional changes and maturity obtained by day 8 of differentiation. Early phases of differentiation, i.e., days 1and 2 were found to be more sensitive than mature stages for both the toxicants. Exposure of 2 h was found to be most effective with maximum sensitivity for 2 days differentiated cells. Though, the cells responded similarly to both the toxicants i.e., MCP and Cyp, but the magnitude of alterations following Cyp exposure was lower than MCP at all the time points for both the concentrations used. Hence, indicates the selective response of the cells. The system was validated for its specificity under identical conditions using 4-hydroxynonenal (HNE), a known neurotoxicant generated indigenously in the body by oxidation of w-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids. Like MCP and Cyp, early stages of differentiation were found to be more vulnerable to this compound too. It was observed that 4-HNE induced toxicity was largely mediated by involving the specific neurotransmitter receptors viz., cholinergic-muscarinic, benzodiazepine, serotonin 5HT2A and dopamine DA-D2 and oxidative stress associated genes. Thus, chemical specific response of differentiating PC12 cells indicates their applicability as in vitro tool for rapid screening to assess the developmental neurotoxicity potential of environmental chemicals/drugs and NCEs.

Toxicology In Vitro 2008: 22(7): 1681-1688.

Annals of Neurosciences 2008: 15: 60-68.

Toxicology In Vitro 2010: 24: 1592–1598.

Toxicology In Vitro 2010: 24: 1681-1688.

Toxicology and Industrial Health 2010: 26(8): 533-42.

Human and Experimental Toxicology. 2011: 30(3):192-198.

Human and Experimental Toxicology.2011: 30(8):860-869.

Toxicology In Vitro. 2011: 25(4):848-858.

Chemical Research in Toxicology. 2010: 23(11): 1663-1672.

PLOs One. 2011: 6(3):e17757.

Journal of Biological Chemistry. 2011:286(43):37347-57

Free Radical Research.2011: 45(9):1061-73

Toxicology and Industrial Health. 2013: Oct 8. [Epub ahead of print]

In Vitro model of ischemic cerebral stroke: The development of neuroprotective drugs against ischemic insult is hampered by the lack of pharmacological in vitro models. Thus, studies were carried out to develop cerebral ischemia model using primary cultures of rat brain neuronal cells and PC12 cells, a rat pheochromocytoma cell line. Following the oxygen and glucose deprivation (OGD) and then re-oxygenation (24h) under regular atmospheric oxygen in the medium with glucose (4-6 mg/ml), cells were assayed to dissect the molecular and cellular cascade of events takes place under clinical situations. These model systems were found to be mimicking the events similar to the pahto-physiological events take place in the clinical/ in vivo cases of cerebral stroke. Validation of the system using known neuroprotectant viz., curcumin, W. somnifera, Trans-resveratrol has been completed. The drug specific response of the system shows its sensitivity and applicability as the first tier of screening for anti-stroke potential of new drug candidate molecules. The data have led to the usage of PC-12 cells and primary cultures of rat brain cells as models to surrogate in vivo system for cerebral ischemic stroke. Validation of the models with more number of drugs is being carried out.

Journal of Physiology and Pharmacology 2006: 50 (2): 157-162.

Toxicology Mechanism and Methods 2009; 19(1): 1-7

European Journal of Pharmacology 2011; 666(1-3):5-11

ACS Chemical Neuroscience 2013; 4(2):285-94

Xenobiotic metabolizing profiling of rat brain cells: Cytochrome P450s (CYPs) have been identified as the functional enzymes in brain catalyzing the metabolic activation and detoxification of xenobiotics reaching to the brain. It has been documented that the brain has an uneven distribution of CYPs. Thus, attempts were made to investigate the cell specific expression and regulation of CYPs in cultured rat brain neuronal and glial cells and to study the differences, if any, in their sensitivity towards neurotoxins. Constitutive and inducible expression (MRNA and protein) and catalytic activity of CYP1A1/1A2, 2B1/2B2 and 2E1 were carried out following the exposure of known inducers viz., 3-methylchlorantherene, phenobarbital and ethanol respectively. Both neuronal and glial cells were found to have the significant expression and activity of CYP1A1, 2B2 and 2E1 with neurons exhibiting relatively higher levels. Interestingly, greater magnitude of induction of CYP2E1 was observed in neuronal cells, whereas glial cells were found to be more sensitive for CYP1A and 2B following known CYP inducers. The similar induction pattern of expression and activity of specific CYPs was in neuronal and glial cells, when exposed to deltamethrin. Deltamethrin induced expression and activity of CYPs in cultured neuronal cells could help in explaining the deltamethrin mediated synthesis or/and transport of the neurotransmitters. The induction of specific CYPs in glial cells is also of significance, as these cells are thought to be involved in protecting the neurons from environmental insults and safeguard them from toxicity. The differences in the induction of CYPs in cultured neuronal and glial cells have indicated the sensitivity differences of these CYPs, which may help to understand the regional specificity of brain to deltamethrin and involvement of CYPs in the toxication/ detoxification mechanisms in the brain.

Journal of Neurochemistry, 2003: 52:87 (S-1).

Journal of Neurochemistry, 2004: 68: 88 (S-1).

Life Sciences 2006: 79(16): 1514-1522.

Life Sciences 2006: 79 (25): 2387-2394.

Molecular and Cellular Biochemistry 2007: 305:199-207

Toxicological Sciences 2012;129(2):392-410)

Neuro-molecular Medicine 2013; 15(3):570-592

PLoS One. 2014: 9(3):e91946.

Models to Study the Organ Specific Toxicity

Cytotoxicity: L929, an adherent type mouse fibroblast cell line system has been established as in vitro tool to assess the cytotoxicity/ biosafety of industrial products and environmental chemicals. Bacterial endotoxin detection using LAL reagent has been established in miniaturized (50ml sample volume) 96 well format and found to have equal sensitivity like conventional method with 2 ml. Both these systems are being used to generate an external cash flow through sponsored studies referred to IITR, Lucknow.

Human & Experimental Toxicology.2001: 20 (8), 412-417.

Surgical Infections (Larchmt). 2014 June;15(3):213-20.

Current Medicinal Chemistry. 2014;21(9):1160-70.

Environmental Science Pollution Research International. 2013:20(11):8274-81. 

Gastrointestinal toxicity: Investigations were made to evaluate the in vitro toxicity of arsenite in rat intestinal epithelial cell line (IEC-6) and primary cultures (IEC) and compared the results with in situ experiments with rat intestine epithelial cells. Results were found to have a good correlation between in vitro, in situ and in vivo experimentations. Data suggest the applicability of intestinal epithelial cell line (IEC-6) as a surrogate alternate to animal model for initial screening of gastrointestinal toxicity caused by heavy metals and other chemicals. 

Toxicology In Vitro 2007: 21: 32-40.

FEMS Immunology and Medical Microbiology 2008: 54:60–69.

Human and Experimental Toxicology 2010: 29(10):833-43.

PLoS One. 2011: 6(5):e20446. Epub 2011 May 24.

Phototoxicity: NIHT3T and L929, mouse fibroblast cell lines were employed to assess the photo-safety of drugs and chemicals following experimental exposure of different doses of UVA, UVB and sunlight. As observed under in vivo studies, sunlight was found to be profound in the case of all the drugs tested followed by UVA and UVB respectively in both the cell lines. Both the cells used have shown equal sensitivity, thus may be suggested their suitability for in vitro photo-safety evaluation of drugs and chemicals.

Photochemistry and Photobiology 2007: 83: 1226-1236.

Bio-resource Technology.2011: 102: 2979-2984.

Hepatotoxicity: Human hepatoma cell line-HepG2 was employed to study the mechanism of toxicity of repeated fried fish oil (RFFO) extracts containing a mixture of PAHs. Induction in the CYP1A1 dependent EROD, AHH activity, which eventually led to cytotoxic responses were dose dependent in both liver and HepG2. The phenomenal induction in the activity of these enzymes could be well correlated with the generation of PAHs in RFFO. The results suggest that RFFO extract has substantial cytotoxic potential in HepG2 cells through induction of CYP1A1 catalytic activity leading to metabolic activation of PAHs generated per se. Thus, the usefulness of HepG2 cells may be suggested as a suitable in vitro tool for investigation the toxicological/metabolic consequences of PAHs and other hepatotoxicants.

Toxicology In Vitro 2006: 20 (3), 308-316.

Genotoxicity: In order to investigate the modulatory effects of alcohol (dietary habits) on the genotoxicity potential of occupational exposure of pesticides, studies were conducted using primary cultures of human peripheral blood lymphocytes. Further, studies were carried out using asbestos fine particles and LNCap cell line as the other cellular system to see the linearity in the results. A significant synergism in the genotoxic responses could be recorded when results of co-exposure of pesticide-ethanol were compared with independent exposures. Primary cultures of human peripheral blood lymphocytes were found to be more sensitive than LNCap immortal cell line.

Life Sciences 80: 2137–2146.

Nanotoxicology. 2011: 5(2):195-207.

PLoS One. 2011: 6(9):e25767.

Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications 2010: 396:578–583.

Biomaterials. 2012: 33(16):4204-19

European Journal of Pharmacy and Biopharmacology. 2014 May10[Epub ahead of print]

Oral Toxicity: Studies were extended to develop the in vitro models to understand the basic mechanisms involved in the toxicity/ biosafety and regeneration behaviour of cells in the oral cavity. Primary cultures of periodontal ligament fibroblast (PDL), gingival fibroblast (GF) and pulp cells were established and used under these studies. The thrust was to develop rapid and reliable cell based in vitro models to study the various possible approaches to minimize the loss of cell viability and increase the cell proliferation in the cells responsible to hold the tooth in the socket and to study the toxic responses/Biosafety of materials commonly used in the dentistry.

Journal of Periodontal Research 2004: 39; 373-379.

Journal of Dental Traumatology. 2011: 27(2):102-128.

Toxicology International. 2012: 19(3):225-34.

Journal of Dental Traumatology. 2013:29(5):389-93.

Most significant work in the area of research:

In twenty five year’s active research career, dedicated and sustained efforts have been made to develop and validate newer, more sensitive and better predictive in vitro test models to assess the neurotoxicity/ developmental neurotoxicity using human stem cell derived differentiating neuronal cells. I have been instrumental in establishing the ‘State of the Art Facility’ for stem cell research in northern part of my country. We have reported for the first time the complete metabolic profile and its regulation in human cord blood stem cell derived developing neurons [Toxicological Sciences 2012;129(2):392-410; Neuro-molecular Medicine. 2013; 15(3):570-592; Molecular Neurobiology 2014;May 24]. In the year 2012, we have published the data on differentiation mechanism(s) of stem cell derived human neurons in the journal “Stem Cells and Development”. Prof. Shinya Yamanaka and Prof. John B. Gurdon, the Nobel Laureates of 2012 (Medicine and Physiology) have also published their data in the same journal in 2012. In last three years, Prof. Shinya Yamanaka has published six papers in Journal “PLoS ONE”, and we have also published four research papers in “PLoS ONE”, so the quality and relevance of data produced by my research group can be well assessed. One of our papers published in “Chemical Research in Toxicology” [23(11): 1663-1672; 2010] has been ranked number one in the list of hottest fifty papers published in 2010 in the entire range of journals published by the American Chemical Society (http://www.chemfeeds.com/hot.php?time= year). The publication demonstrates the cellular and molecular insights involved in the organophosphate pesticide-monocrotophos induced the apoptotic cell death in neuronal cells. The same paper has also been included in the final examination (December 16, 2010) of course designed for graduate and advanced undergraduate students in Environmental Sciences & Toxicology, and related disciplines at The North Carolina University of Chapel Hill, USA. The paper has also been picked-up by several scientific news agencies to highlight the findings, for instance-http://www.newsrx. com/newsletters/Life-Science-Weekly/2011-01-11/2501112011649LS.html. One of our papers published in PLoS ONE:6(3):e17757;2011 has received overwhelming response among the scientists as evidenced by huge viewing and downloading of the article (over 4500). We have also developed in vitro models to study the ischemic neuronal injury. The system is in use extensively to study the anti-stroke potential of drugs and new molecules. [Toxicology Mechanism and Methods 2009; 19(1): 1-7.; European Journal of Pharmacology 2011; 666(1-3):5-11; ACS Chemical Neuroscience 2013; 4(2):285-94]. Our fifteen papers have been included in the “Comparative Toxicogenomics Database” (CTD; http://ctdbase.org/) under “Chemical-Gene Interactions and Diseases". CTD is an NIEHS-funded public database that elucidates molecular mechanisms by which environmental chemicals affect the disease. It contains chemical-gene-disease interactions curated from the scientific literature.

We have been granted a copyright (No. 013/CR/2006/748854) for the development of “Bio-calculators” for the rapid and precise calculations of biological and statistical endpoints. Besides this, a dynamic ‘Online Human Health Risk Assessment System’ has also been developed for Indian population. Using this Online Health Information System, any individual can assess the health status and potential health risk by own. In addition to that, bioscience calculators related to the Statistical, Oxidative stress, Xenobiotic Markers, Food Technology and Statistically Analysis have also been uploaded to this online system to make the biological calculations accurate, easy and rapid. A wide range of information on various research organizations, scientific journals and many more features of this Online Information System may also be obtained through this system. This online system can be operated through our website- http://healthriskindia.in.

Impact of the contributions: 

I have been instrumental in establishing a new area of research i.e., ‘in vitro developmental neurotoxicity’ by employing the non-transformed human umbilical cord blood stem cell derived neuronal cells. We are the first, who published the high quality data on complete expression profile of stem cell derived neuronal cells all through the developmental stages, their xenobiotic metabolizing capability status and applicability in developmental neurotoxicity. 

The experimental model of ischemic cerebral stroke developed by me at CSIR-IITR, India has extensively been used as a high throughput screening tool to evaluate the target specific anti-stroke potential of drugs and new molecules worldwide.

Our research work published in Chemical Research in Toxicology 23(11): 1663-1672; 2010 has been ranked number one (received 516 votes) in the list of hottest fifty papers published in 2010 in the entire range of journals published by the American Chemical Society (http://www.chemfeeds. com/hot.php?time=year).

The same paper had also been included in the final examination (December 16, 2010) of course planned for graduate and advanced undergraduate students in Environmental Sciences & Toxicology, and related disciplines at The North Carolina University of Chapel Hill, USA

Being ‘National GLP Inspector’, I am providing my services to the National GLP Compliance Monitoring Authority, Department of Science & Technology, Ministry of Science & Technology, Government of India, for GLP accreditation and monitoring of the implementation of the OECD Principles of GLP in GLP Certified Laboratories in the country. Under my leadership, my research organization i.e., CSIR-Indian Institute of Toxicology Research, Lucknow-India, got a pride to be the first GLP Certified Laboratory among the 37 Laboratories of CSIR, India.   

Fifteen of our research papers have been admitted in the “Comparative Toxicogenomics Database (CTD; http://ctdbase.org/) under “Chemical-Gene Interactions and Diseases". CTD is an NIEHS-funded public database that elucidates molecular mechanisms by which environmental chemicals affect the disease. It contains chemical-gene-disease interactions curated from the scientific literature. http://ctdbase.org/basicQuery.go?bqCat=reference&bq =Pant +AB

CSIR Focused Network-EMPOWER (CFN-EMPOWER) Projects under CSIR-WWW: My project proposal “Integrated gene chip to detect organ specific responses against xenobiotics in one go” (CSIR/WWW/IITR/101) was ranked number 1 in average rating i.e., 4.64/5.0; and ranked 6 out of the total 640 projects submitted in terms of ‘Most Discussed and Most Networked Project’. The project was shortlisted in 189 project proposals. The task had been finally short listed for possible funding.

Research Grants received (Last Five years only):

Extramural projects

Sl. No

Title of Project

Project Category

Participating Agencies

Role as defined

1

Development of in vitro models of cerebral stroke to evaluate neuroprotective effects of herbal drugs

Basic/ Applied

ICMR

PI

2

Studies on the expression and regulation of xenobiotic metabolizing cytochrome P450s in human brain cells

Basic/ Applied

CST-UP

PI

3

Functional neuronal differentiation of human cord blood stem cells: tool to study the chemical induced developmental neurotoxicity

Basic/ Applied

DBT

PI

4

Functional characterization of brain cytochrome P450s in differentiating neuronal and glial cells - derived from human umbilical cord blood stem cells

Basic/ Applied

DST

PI

5

Dissecting the signaling cascade involved in Trans-Resveratrol induced neuronal differentiation in PC12 cells: Implications in   neurodegenerative disorders

Basic/ Applied

DBT

PI

6

Therapeutic interventions in oral sub-mucous fibrosis: an experimental study

Basic

ICMR

PI

7

Development of monoclonal antibody based ELISA/Dip stick kits for GM food and crops

Basic/ Applied

DBT

PI

8

To study the genetic stability of bacterial strain from earthworm gut in situ      application in detoxification of endosulfan

Basic

CST-UP

Co-I

9

Neurotoxicity of synthetic pyrethroid (Lambda-cyhalothrin) pesticide: behavioral, neurochemical and immunohistochemical studies in developing and young rats.

Basic

ICMR

Co-I

10

Development of ELISA & PCR based tests for GM Crops & Food

Basic/ Applied

DBT

Co-I

11

Role of microRNAs in neuronal differentiation and regulation of their expression by known developmental neurotoxins

Basic

DBT

Co-I

12

Identification and validation of early biomarkers for predicting toxicity including pre-carcinogenic leasons in individuals occupationally exposed to PAHs and through tobacco

Basic/ Applied

ICMR   Indo-US

Co-I

13

Prenatal viral infection: neuroimmunoigical, molecular and cognitive consequences during development, adulthood and senility in mice

Basic

ICMR

Co-I

14

Human cord blood stem cells derived 3D neuronal network: mechanistic understanding of chemical induced developmental neurotoxicity and neuroprotection (Approved in Principal, but funds are yet to receive)

Basic/ Applied

ICMR

PI

Intramural projects

Sl. No

Title of Project

Project Category

Participating Agencies

Role as defined

1

Stem cells: in vitro tool to understand the mechanisms of pesticide induced developmental neurotoxicity.

Basic/ Applied

CSIR    (SIP-08)

PI

2

Development and validation of in vitro models of developmental neurotoxicity

Basic/ Applied

CSIR    (SIP-08)

PI

3

Stem cell derived skin dendritic cells: an in vitro tool to assess the immune-toxicity of environmental contaminants.

Basic/ Applied

CSIR  (NWP-17)

PI

4

Development and validation of in vitro models for cytotoxicity, neurotoxicity and metabolism assessment

Basic/ Applied

CSIR (NWP-34)

PI

5

Secretome based stage specific markers of developmental neurotoxicity in hematopoietic stem cell derived differentiating neuronal

Basic/ Applied

CSIR (BSC-0111)

PI

6

Molecular imprinting of genes associated with neural development, injury and repair in differentiating neural cells derived from human umbilical cord blood stem cells

Basic/ Applied

CSIR (BSC-0111)

PI

7

In vitro model of ischemic cerebral stroke: applicability of human neuronal cells derived from umbilical cord blood stem cells

Basic/ Applied

CSIR (BSC-0103)

PI

 

Major Programs

Sl. No

Title  of the Project

Coordinating Agency

Contribution being made by you as representative of your organization*

1

Good Laboratory Practices

NGCMA, DST     New Delhi

National GLP Inspector

2

Quality Management System

BIS                        New Delhi

Member, Task force for plastic and polymeric products (PCD-12, PCD-21)

3

National SOP for Patients Consent in India

Institute of Medicine & Law, Mumbai

Member, Drafting Committee

4

Quality Management System

CSIR-IITR-NABL

Technical Operation Manager

5

Integrated NextGen approaches in health, disease and environmental toxicity (BSC-0111)

CSIR-IITR    Lucknow

PI for two R&D activities

6

New approaches towards understanding of disease dynamics and to accelerate drug discovery (BSC-0103)

CSIR-CDRI   Lucknow

PI for one R&D activity

7

Investigative Toxicology: New paradigms (Supra-institutional Project-SIP-08)

CSIR-IITR Lucknow

PI for two R&D activities

 

Partial List of Research Publications
Awards/Honours/Distinctions

Awards/Honours/ Distinctions                            

Details of selected awards received:

Name of Award

Name of the awarding body

Year

Vigyan Ratna Award-2010

Council of Science & Technology Uttar Pradesh, Government of Uttar Pradesh, Lucknow, India

2010

STOX/ASAW Gold Medal-2011

Society of Toxicology, India

2011

Shakuntala Amir Chand Prize-2007

Indian Council of Medical Research, Government of India, New Delhi, India

2011

National Bioscience Award for Career Development-2012

Department of Biotechnology, Ministry of Science & Technology, Government of India

2013

AEB Gold Medal-2013 for Meritorious Service-2013

Academy of Environmental Biology, India

2013

Fellowship/ Membership in Professional Societies:

Fellow: Academy of Toxicological Sciences, USA (One among the only two Indians)

Fellow: Society of Toxicology, India

Fellow: Academy of Sciences for Animal Welfare, Animal Welfare Board, Ministry of Environment & Forest, Government of India

Fellow: Academy of Environmental Biology

Fellow: Indian Academy of Neurosciences

Member: National Academy of Sciences, India.

Member: National Academy of Medical Sciences, India

Member: International Society for Stem Cell Research (ISSCR), USA

Member: Society of Toxicology, USA

Member: International Neurochemistry Society, USA

Member: European Society of Toxicology In Vitro 

Member: Academy of Environmental Biology India

Member: Indian Academy of Neurosciences

Member: Indian Neurochemistry Society 

Member: Environmental Mutagen Society, India

Member: Advisory Board of Research & Executive Council of National Centre for Stem Cell Technology & Research UP, India

Member: Indian Society for Parasitology

Member: UP Association for Science & Technology Advancement, India

Member: Red Cross Society, Indian Chapter

Member: St. John Ambulance Association, Indian Chapter

Expert Member in National Regulatory/Scientific Bodies:


Secretary General, Society of Toxicology, India, since May 2012. 

Technical Operational Manager, in a team of NABL for biosafety assessment of plastic and polymeric products at Institute level. The role is to ensure the compliance of ‘Laboratory Quality Management System and Internal Audit’ as per IS/ISO/IEC 17025:2005 and ISO/IEC 17025:2005, ISO 15189:2007 Standards.

National GLP Inspectors, Department of Science & Technology, Ministry of Science & Technology, Government of India, New Delhi.

Member, National Review Committee for Plastic and Polymeric products at Bureau of Indian Standards (PCD-12 and 21).

Received training on ‘Intellectual Property & Opportunities in Biotechnology’ held at Biotech Park, Lucknow, India, in May 2008.

Received training on ‘FP7 Health Information system’ held at Central Drug Research Institute, a National Laboratory of Council of Scientific & Industrial Research, Government of India, New Delhi, India, on March, 2010.  

Honorary e-consultant in the area of Toxicology and Forensic Sciences through www.indmedica.com   

Member, Advisory Board of Research & Executive Council of National Centre for Stem Cell Technology & Research (India), UP (Since January 2008- till date)

Member, Panel of Expert for the assessment of Scientists working at Central Research Institute (Ayurveda), Central Council for Research Ayurveda and Siddha, Ministry of Health & Family Welfare, Govt. of India. (Since 2008- till date)

Member, Biosafety Committee, Aligarh Muslim University, Aligarh. (Since 2009- till date)

Member, Research Council, Dr. Ram Manohar Lohia Institute of Medical Sciences, Lucknow (UP)

Chairman, ‘Ethical Clearance Committee for Stem Cell Research’ at Dr. Ram Manohar Lohia Institute of Medical Sciences, Lucknow (UP)

Member, Research Council, Amity University, Lucknow (UP)

Member, Research Council, Integral University, Lucknow (UP)

Member, Research Committee Biotechnology, Gautam Buddha Technical University, Lucknow (Formerly: UP Technical University, Lucknow) 

Member, Panel of Expert for the assessment of Scientists working at Central Research Institute (Ayurveda), Central Council for Research Ayurveda and Siddha, Ministry of Health & Family Welfare, Govt. of India.

Member, Selection Committees of more than ten Universities in India.

Member, Selection Committee for the appointment of faculty position at Pt. RN Sharma Institute of Ayurveda, Alternate Medical Education and Research, Bundelkhand University, Jhansi, on July 9, 2008.   

Chair the Scientific Sessions in more than twenty National and International Symposia/ Conferences held at various parts of the country in last 5-6 years.

Chairman of the selection panel constituted for the interview of aspirants for admission in B.Tech, MSc. and M.Tech. courses in Amity University, Lucknow (2008-2012)

Editorial Assignments:


Managing Editor, Toxicology International, the official journal of the Society of Toxicology, India (January 2011- till date)

Academic Editor, PLoS ONE (January 2012- till date) 

Executive Editor: Journal of Clinical Toxicology (January 2013- till date)

Editor, Journal of Ecophysiology and Occupational Health, official journal of Academy of Environmental Biology, India (January 2006- till date)

Member, International Editorial Board of National Journal of Physiology, Pharmacy and Pharmacology (March 2011 – till date)

Senior Editor, ‘The Age of Biotechnology’ for Microbiology/Pharmacy/Biomedical Section (January 2011- till date)

Editorial Member, News Bulletin of Environmental Mutagenesis Society of India (January 2004 -December 2006)

Member: International Editorial Board, IMTU Medical Journal (April 2012- till date)

Member Advisory Board, Journal of Toxicology Research (November 2012- till date)

Review Editor: Frontiers in Pharmacogenetics and Pharmacogenomics (January 2013-till date)

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